How to Travel with a Dog in South East Asia?

Has anybody experience on traveling in South East Asia with a dog? Or transporting him from Europe? I am not traveling with my dog right now but there s a possibility that I’ll install myself for a year in cambodia. In that case I want to bring my dog too. Again, I am looking for advice from someone who has done it, at least the transport.

Question Geography | Location: South East Asia
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Travel 5 Answers 1135 views 1

Answers ( 5 )

    1

    That’s close to animal torture/abuse… seriously! It’s HOT, but it’s not a tropical climate. Many street dogs will attack your dog because it’s their territory. The food… The long fly… The place you sleep… I guess there aren’t always dogs allowed… don’t do it.

    Taking a dog on a long haul flight in the hold should only be done if you absolutely have to. If you’re only moving abroad for a year and then returning, I won’t risk it. It’s extremely distressing for them in the hold – and they have no toilet or access to food. It’s at least 16 hours to Bangkok or Hanoi/HCMC and then another hour to Cambodia. You would be trusting the staff at random airports to go and check on him if you have layovers.

    I lived in Cambodia – no dogs are leashed, and most roam around pretty wild. You’d have to keep him inside all day or with you, and he would likely get attacked by the local dogs. Then you’ve got the question of quarantine to take him back home with you at the end of the trip.

    My friend flew his dog in a 45 mins flight, and he got really stressed because of it and was shaking and felt sick… And it was just 45 mins flight. I would recommend not doing it especially if its a long flight. Because they won’t sit with you, they will be in the compartment with the bags… I mean weather is okay in South East Asia for dogs… But the travel.. I wouldn’t recommend it.

    • Elvie Witting
      1

      I have to check again since you mention that but I saw a flight from Istanbul to Bangkok of around 8-9hrs, no layovers. Then I can move by land. I have lived in Greece; there are stay dogs too, not very friendly either. I am sure people have pets in this country too. And of course my dog he’ll be at home unless out with me… its what we do at home. Before you say something on this, even if I put him on the garden he’ll spend all day in front of the door waiting to get in. But even in the garden, I would not leave him alone.

      • Lexie Schowalter
        0

        It would be difficult to take him out and protect him from rabies etc. Personally, I wouldn’t consider it – way too many strays and territorial dogs (who have owners but no one leashes their dogs in Cambodia, they just roam freely).

        • Elvie Witting
          0

          My dog has traveled already on a plane in cabin many times and he’s really ok. I’d try not to get him on hold that’s why I am looking for someone who HAS the experience and not general theoretical issues about dogs and traveling, between, I cannot know all the issues but I wonder why your friend didn’t give a pill to her dog before the flight. My dog has also rabies vaccination back home. Greece is also very dangerous for this too but anyway even in Belgium he has all these vaccinations!

          • Lexie Schowalter
            0

            I’m not giving you general theoretical issues; I’m telling you my first-hand experience of living in Siem Reap and whether I would take my dog to live there. The rabies vaccine doesn’t stop him from getting rabies; it just gives you an extra 24 hours to get him treatment.

            Every time he gets bit or scratched you’ll need to go and give him those huge injections and make him unwell (also costly for you) as you won’t know if the animal that’s hurt him has rabies or not. There are dogs fighting everywhere.

            • Elvie Witting
              1

              I do appreciate your effort and time doing so (without being rude and giving argumentation), but I do look for someone who has transported or traveled with a dog. I know the general risks and most of them I face them in my country of origin. They can be avoided: heat, you go out early, stay dogs not all are aggressive, many will leave when you take the dog in your hands, if people are around may stop them, ultra-rays may work, there are a number of things which can be done.

              I will visit Cambodia soon and I’ll assess the situation. I’ll check what happens once back to Europe. As I said there’s no way that I know my dog goes on quarantine and he travels. I don t plan to have him scratched by other dogs that often.

              • Lexie Schowalter
                0

                I think checking it out is a good plan. Enquire about dogs in apartments too as the western apartments we looked at all said no pets.

                Of course, you wouldn’t want him to get scratched by other dogs but with him on a leash and the other does not, he’ll be at a disadvantage and him (or you!) could get scratched/bit quite easily. Most of the dogs there are territorial as the owners keep for safety. Comparing Greece and Cambodia is like night and day! Just bear in mind that it’s very different.

    1

    Is your dog old or young? My friend settled in Cambodia, and her dog developed a health problem. Just like human that travels to developing country will get sick before they adapt, dogs will also get in contact with different diseases , bacterias and parasites than in our home if the dog is still young, he might get over it just fine ( they are good vets to help) but if the dog is old, it might not be for the best.

    It is not so complicated to get the dog in, except for the whole flying thing, but will be more complicated if you were to bring it back to a Western country (can be up to 3 months quarantine, proof of vaccination, dog passport, etc.). There is a lot of strays in Asia and must vaccinate your dog for rabies and would say a whole bunch of other stuff too if you were to decide to take him. For traveling might not be the best because of the territorial issues but if you were to settle, well really need to make sure it will be the best for your dog and not only for you.

    0

    You will need to check your country restriction on quarantine after taking the dog back from Cambodia, and it won’t be a problem taking him in. Might be harder for accommodation but I am sure you can find that easily online through expat pages guesthouse than accepts dogs. You might get charged extra.

    I have not experienced taking a dog in, but my friend from Turkey did. Unfortunately, the dog was old, and after a few months, the health of the dog decreased drastically. It is unrecognizable, and I find it pretty sad, but she was moving here for good. I’ve adopted a dog in Cambodia and sometime wonder if I was to go home (to Canada) for a year, would I take him? In my case, I don’t think so because a dog that has always been free might not go through that 3 months quarantine and I am not sure a Cambodian dog would survive long winters!

    • Elvie Witting
      0

      Quarantines are horrible. I completely understand you. I left my dog for a year but well if I stay in Asia that would make it 2 years. He’s 6 years old, not young, not old. He’s used to traveling but only within Europe.

    0

    I met a girl in Thailand who had rescued a street dog from India and then went to travel to Cambodia and stay there for 6 months. It wasn’t cheap, but it definitely is possible to travel with a dog. I would suggest maybe going to the Cambodian embassy before you leave because they should be able to tell you everything you need to do to bring the dog to Cambodia. You’ll probably also have to reach out to whatever airline you’re using in advance to make arrangements for the dog.

    • Elvie Witting
      0

      Yes, I am sure its possible. I’ve met a woman who was bringing her dog to India every year but I don’t have her contact.

      And actually yes, the airline is my biggest fear. I want the dog to travel in the cabin but he’s a bit fat than what he should be. I know the dog can travel in the cabin should the pilot gives authorization… its true and very complicated but I can’t do another year without the dog!

    0

    I don’t know about Cambodia exactly, but the flight will be quiet expensive. You’ll also need a lot vaccinations. And then a few countries wants to have the dogs in quarantine to be sure he/she is not sick at all.

    It can be hard to travel with a dog especially with the street dogs which are sometimes really aggressive with the stranger’s dogs. If you stay in one place it should be doable.

    • Elvie Witting
      0

      I was actually thinking of flying to Bangkok as the flight is cheaper/shorter and then move to Cambodia by land. The dog always has the needed vaccination. They are obligatory for European flights too. Possibly here are some extras depending on the country of arrival.

      Plus I think there is no quarantine for Cambodia/Thailand… If so, we stay in Europe. I’m not sure what happens with non-informed/corrupted staff at the airports.

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